Best Tourism Film with Sachtler in 3D

Perfect camera pans over the Alps with the Sachtler fluid heads Video 18 and Video 25: Andreas Meschuh during the 3D shoots

An atmospheric sunrise over the Alps, a small church in the middle of blooming trees, perfect camera pans across turquoise-blue mountain lakes and sun-drenched vineyards: The Austrian director and (3D-) cinematographer Andreas Meschuh worked for his promotional film "Styria – The Green Heart of Austria" with the Video 18 and Video 25 fluid heads from Sachtler, a Vitec Group brand. Emotional pictures dominate the film. Meschuh portrayed his homeland with a passion for detail and has received numerous awards for this work.

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Heavy 3D rigs

Andreas Meschuh has worked with stereoscopic imaging for more than 15 years and has made 3D developments his specialty. In 2005, he created his own stereoscopic real image recording system together with his production company Art-Media. Andreas Meschuh used side-by-side rigs to film the 3D version of the film about Styria. Here, both cameras are adjustably mounted in their stereo basis (camera distance) on a rail. Consequently, the distances between cameras can be increased more than is usually possible. "Among other things, I decided in favor of Sachtler camera support because of the high payload of these rigs," explains Andreas Meschuh. "With a payload range of 8 to 35 kg (18 to 77 lbs), the Video 25 fluid head is ideal for our 3D rigs." Its 18 steps enable comfortable and fast counterbalancing.

Extreme temperature differences

The seven horizontal and seven vertical grades of drag provided perfect camera pans, which significantly shape the film – across green alpine pastures and rippling mountain streams, for example. "Since we had to cover every season with the film, we were confronted with enormous temperature differences. Even at -40°C (-40°F) on a glacier, Sachtler tripods continue to work smoothly. Together with the 3D rig and the Video 25, I used the robust Sachtler EFP 2 CF carbon-fiber tripod. The mid-level spreader provided additional stability," says Andreas Meschuh.

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Prize for multi-faceted shots

During a period of 16 months, this Austrian from Graz was on the go in Styria – in total, there were 300 shooting hours. He captured idyllic pictures of the vineyards of the southern Styrian hill country, filmed fast-paced ski-runs on the Dachstein Glacier, staged a typical winetasting session, showed a Styrian chopping wood in traditional costume, and filmed during Styrian celebrations. The film thus conveys a multi-faceted impression of Styria as a tourism region. Meschuh's concept hit home: The film about Styria won twelve international prizes and came out on top against a total of 141 submitted films at the film festivals. Most recently, it was honored with the Grand Prix CIFFT 2010 for the best tourism film worldwide.

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