Olympic Summer Sports 2012

posted:

21/06/2012

At the London Olympics 26 Sports will take place at 31 Location at the Olympic Park in London and accross the UK

At the first Olympic Games, nine sports were contested. Since then, the number of sports contested at the Summer Olympic Games has gradually risen to twenty-eight on the program for 2000-2008. At the 2012 Summer Olympics, however, the number of sports will fall back to twenty-six following an IOC decision in 2005 to remove baseball and softball from the Olympic program.

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These sports retain their status as Olympic sports with the possibility of a return to the Olympic program in future games. At the 121st IOC Session in Copenhagen on 9 October 2009, the IOC voted to reinstate both golf and rugby to the Olympic program, meaning that the number of sports to be contested in 2016 will be back up to 28 again. The IOC has put a limit of 28 sports in the Summer Olympics, therefore no further sports may be added unless existing sports are removed.

In order for a sport or discipline to be considered for inclusion in the list of Summer Olympics sports, it must be widely practiced in at least 75 countries, spread over four continents. Women's sports or disciplines may be considered if practiced in at least 50 countries.

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Seven of the 26 sports on the Olympic program in London consist of multiple disciplines: Aquatics with Diving, Swimming, Synchronised Swimming and Waterpolo; Canoeing/Kayak with Sprint and Slalom; Cycling with BMX, Mountain Biking, Road and Track; Gymnastics with Artistic, Rhythmic and Trampoline; Volleyball with Beach and Indoor; Equestrian with Dressage, Eventing and Jumping. This adds up to 38 Olympic Events taking place in London.

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Archery

Archery

Archery dates back around 10,000 years, when bows and arrows were first used for hunting and warfare, before it developed as a competitive activity in medieval England. In the 14th century, archery was considered so important to the defence of the nation that an English law made it compulsory for every man aged between seven and 60. Archery had its debut at the 1900 Summer Olympics and has been contested in 13 Olympiads. Eighty three different nations have appeared in the Olympic archery competitions, with France appearing the most often at 11 times. It is governed by the International Archery Federation. Recurve archery is the only discipline of archery featured at the Olympic Games.

Archery

Athletics

One of the most popular sports that will feature at the London 2012 Olympic Games is also the biggest: Athletics features 2,000 athletes running, walking, jumping and throwing for gold in 47 events. Athletics is the perfect expression of the Olympic motto ‘Citius, Altius, Fortius’ (‘Faster, Higher, Stronger’) – the competition requires athletes to run faster, throw further, jump higher and leap longer than their rivals. For London 2012, all non-road Athletics events will be held at the Olympic Stadium in the new Olympic Park. This state-of-the-art venue, which will have a capacity of 80,000 during the Games, will also host the Opening and Closing Ceremonies.

Athletics

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Badminton

The London 2012 Badminton competition will be held at Wembley Arena, on a site that has hosted major events ever since the British Empire Exhibition opened there in 1924. Since 1992, badminton has been an Olympic sport with five events: men's and women's singles, men's and women's doubles, and mixed doubles, in which each pair consists of a man and a woman. At high levels of play, especially in singles, the sport demands excellent fitness: players require aerobic stamina, agility, explosive strength, speed and precision. It is also a technical sport, requiring good motor coordination and the development of sophisticated racquet movements.

Badminton

Basketball

At the London 2012 Olympic Games, one of the world’s most popular and fastest-growing team sports will be showcased at the Basketball Arena and the North Greenwich Arena. Basketball was invented in 1891 by Dr James Naismith, a Canadian physical education teacher who wanted to create a game that could be played indoors during the winter by his students at the YMCA in Springfield, Massachusetts. Men’s Basketball first appeared on the Olympic programme at the Berlin 1936 Games, with the women’s event introduced at Montreal 1976. Professional players first competed at the Barcelona 1992, when the famous US ‘Dream Team’ won gold in the men’s event. Prior to its inclusion as a medal sport, it was held as demonstration event in 1904 and 1932, both in the United States.

Basketball

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Beach Volleyball

In 1920, new jetties in Santa Monica, California created a large sandy area for public enjoyment, planting the seed for beach volleyball development in that region. The first permanent nets began to appear, and people soon began playing recreational games on public parts of the beach and in private beach clubs. Beach Volleyball made its Olympic debut at Atlanta 1996. Since then it has become one of the most popular spectator sports at the Games. The London 2012 competition will be held at a special temporary arena on Horse Guards Parade, just steps from Trafalgar Square, which will be covered in 3,000 tonnes of sand. Teams of two will serve, bump and spike their way towards gold in the heart of the capital.

Beach Volleyball

Boxing

Boxing already was popular at the original Olympic Games in the 7th century BC, when opponents fought with strips of leather wrapped around their fists. The sport’s regulations were codified in 1867 as the Marquess of Queensberry Rules, named in honour of the nobleman who endorsed them. The essence of these rules is still in place today, governing this perennially exciting and dramatic Olympic sport. At the London 2012 Games, the ever-popular men’s Boxing events will be joined on the Olympic programme by a women’s competition for the first time. Boxing has featured in every Olympics since 1904, apart from the 1912 Stockholm Games, when Swedish law banned it. Many Olympic boxers have gone on to scale the heights in the professional sport, with Cassius Clay - later, of course, Muhammad Ali - the most notable.

Boxing

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Canoe Slalom

Canoe slalom is a competitive sport where the aim is to navigate a decked canoe or kayak through a course of hanging gates on river rapids in the fastest time possible. Modeled on slalom skiing, the first Canoe Slalom competition was held in Switzerland in 1932. The sport was staged on flat water during its early days, but was later switched to white water rapids. Canoe Slalom didn’t make its debut until the1972 Munich Games and only became a permanent part of the Olympic program in1992. The sport has thrilled spectators at the Games with spectacular, non-stop action on the powerful, unforgiving water. At London 2012, the CanoeSlalom competition will be held at Lee Valley White Water Centre, in a new, world-class facility located on the edge of the 1,000-acre River Lee Country Park.

Canoe Slalom

Canoe Sprint

The histories of the canoe and the kayak go back hundreds of years, but it wasn’t until the middle of the 19th century that the first official canoe and kayak races were held. The sport now takes two forms, the oldest of which is the power-packed, fiercely competitive Canoe Sprint discipline. Canoeing and kayaking has been featured as a competition sport in the Summer Olympic Games since the 1936 Games in Berlin although it was a demonstration sport at the 1924 Games in Paris. Requiring sustained bursts of speed and power, Canoe Sprint at the London 2012 Games will offer thrilling, down-to-the-wire finishes at the Eton Dorney race cource.

Canoe Sprint

Cycling BMX

Somewhere in California during the early 70's, a bunch of kids on modified 20" Schwinn Stingray bicycles went out to a vacant lot and created a brand new sport of their very own.Those kids were probably not even the first. The same scene of youthful energy and American resourcefulness was quite probably going on in Nebraska and/or New Jersey. But it was the California gathering of nameless pioneers who were recorded on film by Bruce Brown's cameras. The fast and furious sport of BMX will be making only its second Olympic appearance at the London 2012 Games. BMX (Bicycle Motocross) began to take off in the late 1960s in California, around the time that motocross became popular in the US. The motorised sport was the inspiration for the pedal-powered version, a breathtaking spectacle that’s since become popular all over the world.

Cycling BMX

Cycling Mountain Bike

The Repack Downhill race in San Francisco is generally considered to have been the first official mountain biking race. Much like BMX, Mountain Biking is a young sport that has risen to worldwide popularity at an amazing rate. Fast, furious and occasionally downright terrifying, the sport developed in northern California during the 1970s. Rocky paths, tricky climbs and technical descents will provide plenty of challenges for riders in the Mountain Bike competition. At London 2012, the Mountain Bike competition will take place at Hadleigh Farm in Essex. The newly constructed course, built especially for the Olympic Games, will provide a tough test for competitors from all over the world.

Cycling Mountain Bike

Cycling Road

According to popular legend, the first ever bicycle race was held in Paris in 1868, and was won by a 19-year-old cyclist from Suffolk named James Moore on a wooden bike with iron tires inlaid with ball-bearings that helped speed him past the competition. At London 2012, a quartet of challenging, exciting Road Cycling events will energise the streets of London and Surrey. After the opening ceremony road cycling will be the first event to take place. Axed for three games after debuting in the first modern Olympic Games in 1896, the sport has become a permanent fixture since 1912. The 1996 Atlanta Games saw professional riders compete for the first time and the introduction of the individual road time trial. Possibly the most romantic Olympic moment happened at the 1984 Games when Davis Phinney and his wife Connie became the first couple to win road cycling medals.

Cycling Road

Cycling Track

Track Cycling has been around since at least 1870. When cycling was in its infancy, wooden indoor tracks were laid which resemble those of modern velodromes, consisting of two straights and slightly banked turns. At the London 2012 Olympic Games, there will be 10 gold medals up for grabs over six action-packed days in the Track Cycling competition staged at the Velodrome in the Olympic Park. Currently enjoying a boom in popularity, the action-packed sport of Track Cycling has featured at every Games but one since the first modern Olympic Games in 1896. The most noticeable changes in over a century of track cycling have concerned the bikes themselves, engineered to be lighter and more aerodynamic to enable ever-faster times.

Cycling Track

Diving

Along with Swimming, Synchronised Swimming and Water Polo, the elegant yet dramatic sport of Diving is one of four disciplines that make up the Olympic sport of Aquatics. Competitive diving developed from gymnastics in the 18th century, when gymnasts in Sweden and Germany began to perform tumbling routines into water. At the London 2012 Games, Diving requires acrobatic excellence and supreme coordination skills, as athletes dive from heights of up to 10m into the waters below. The Diving competition will take place at the dazzling new Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park, designed by acclaimed architect Zaha Hadid and built especially for the Games.

Diving

Equestrian Dressage

Equestrian sport can be traced back more than 2,000 years, when the Greeks introduced dressage training to prepare their horses for war. Classical dressage reached its peak with the development of the Spanish Riding School in Vienna, which laid the basis for the elegant, graceful sport practised today. At the London 2012 Olympic Games, the Dressage events will test the ability of horse and rider to display both athletic prowess and supreme elegance. Along with the other Equestrian events at London 2012, the Dressage competition takes place over four days in a temporary Arena set up in Greenwich Park. There will be 50 competitors in team and individual events. Greenwich Park is London’s oldest Royal Park, dating back to 1433. It has been a World Heritage Site since 1997. Within the Park is The Royal Observatory and the home of Greenwich Mean Time.

Equestrian Dressage

Equestrian Eventing

Along with the other Equestrian events at London 2012, the Eventing competition will be held in the beautiful surroundings of Greenwich Park which is part of the Maritime Greenwich area that has been designated as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Featuring dressage, cross-country and a dramatic jumping finale, the Eventing competition at the London 2012 Games will offer an all-encompassing test of Equestrian skill.There are three distinct parts to the Eventing competition: dressage, which illustrates the harmony between horse and rider; cross-country riding, which requires speed, power and nerve; and jumping, which calls for precision, agility and impeccable technique. The combination tests every element of horsemanship, and offers the spectator plenty of excitement along the way.

Equestrian Eventing

Equestrian Jumping

Jumping is a relatively new equestrian sport. Until the Inclosure Acts, which came into force in England in the 18th century, there had been little need for horses to jump fences routinely, but with this act of Parliament came new challenges for those who followed fox hounds. The Inclosure Acts brought fencing and boundaries to many parts of the country as common ground was dispersed amongst wealthy landowners. This meant that those wishing to pursue their sport now needed horses that were capable of jumping these obstacles. t the London 2012 Olympic Games, the Jumping competition will require horse and rider to navigate a short course with precision, speed and perfect technique. Entry to the various Olympic Equestrian competitions was originally limited to members of the military. However, at the Helsinki Games of 1952, the competition was broadened to include civilian riders.

Equestrian Jumping

Fencing

The history of fencing parallels the evolution of civilization, back from the days of ancient Egypt and Rome, to the barbaric Dark Ages, to the fast and elegant Rennassiance, up to the modern, increasingly popular fencing of today. Fencing has always been regarded as more than a sport; it is an art form, an ancient symbol of power and glory, and a deeply personal, individual form of expression. he tense, testing sport of Fencing has featured at every Olympic Games of the modern era. At London 2012, the Fencing competition will be held at ExCeL. ExCeL is an existing exhibition and conference centre in London's Docklands. Its five arenas will host a range of Olympic sports during the London 2012 Games.

Fencing

Football

Aptly enough, football became a full Olympic medal sport at the London Games of 1908, having been a mere demonstration for the first modern Olympiad, in Athens in 1896. Football will be a major feature of the Olympic programme at London 2012. Beginning with group matches and ending with a knockout phase, the competition will offer all the drama that fans have come to expect from major international tournaments. There will be two medal events at London 2012, one for men’s teams and one for women. The Football competition at London 2012 will be staged at six grounds around the UK, including venues in Wales (Cardiff’s Millennium Stadium) and Scotland (Hampden Park in Glasgow). The finals will take place at Wembley Stadium in London.

Football

Gymnastics Artistic

The grace, strength and skill of Olympic gymnasts have been astonishing audiences since the Games in Ancient Greece, where Gymnastics was regarded as the perfect symmetry between mind and body. The best known of the three Gymnastics disciplines, Artistic Gymnastics is always among the most popular competitions at the Games. Hugely popular with audiences all over the world, Artistic Gymnastics looks set to draw huge crowds to North Greenwich Arena during the London 2012 Olympic Games. The Artistic Gymnastics competition will be held at the state-of-the-art Arena on the River Thames where 14 medal events will take place.

Gymnastics Artistic

Gymnastics Rhythmic

Rhythmic gymnastics took a while to gain traction as a respected sport. That said, the seeds were planted hundreds of years ago. The basis of the idea back then is similar to what it is today, which was that someone should be able to express themselves through movement, and that movement should be recognized and appreciated as sport. Competitive rhythmic gymnastics, with all its grace and elegance, first started in the Soviet Union during the 1940s. Unsurprisingly then, the Russians are the dominate force in the sport having won gold in the last three games. During the London 2012 Olympic Games, grace and beauty will be on show throughout the four days of Rhythmic Gymnastics competition at Wembley Arena. As with synchronised swimming, it is open only to women and has been part of the Olympic programme since the 1984 Los Angeles Games.

Gymnastics Rhythnic

Gymnastics Trampoline

The Eskimos who used to toss one another into the air with a Walrus skin originated the first type of trampolining some have said. Almost like the giant sheet that firemen would use to catch people jumping out of a burning building. There is some evidence of people being tossed in the air by a number of people holding a blanket in England. While these origins may or may not be the true beginnings of trampolining it is certain that at the start of the 20th century there were stage acts that used a "bouncing bed" to amuse audiences in comedy routines. Since making its Olympic debut at the Sydney Games in 2000, the sport has consistently featured awe-inspiring displays of acrobatic excellence, with athletes springing to heights of up to 10m. Prepare to be dazzled by the athletes in the Trampoline competition at the London 2012 Games, the newest of the three Gymnastics disciplines to have arrived on the Olympic programme.

Gymnastics Trampoline

Handball

There are records of handball-like games in medieval France, and among the Inuit in Greenland, in the Middle Ages. By the 19th century, there existed similar games of håndbold from Denmark, házená in the Czech Republic, hádzaná in Slovakia, gandbol in Ukraine, torball in Germany, as well as versions in Uruguay. Speed, skill and stamina are key attributes for competitors in modern Handball, a fast and exhilarating team sport. Handball offers plenty of physical contact and non-stop, end-to-end action. High scoring and a quicksilver pace will combine to make Handball a truly thrilling team sport and should draw big crowds throughout the competition at the London 2012 Olympic Games. For London 2012, the preliminary rounds of both the men’s and women’s competitions, as well as the women’s quarter-finals, will take place at the brand new Copper Box in the Olympic Park. The competition will then move to the Basketball Arena, also in the Olympic Park, for the men’s quarter-finals, all semi-finals and all medal matches.

Handball

Hockey

The game of Hockey has been around from the time of early civilization. Some of the reports find the earliest origin of the game 4000 years back. Field hockey was reportedly played even before the birth of Christ. Basically known as the “ball and stick” game, it was played since ancient times in places diverse as Rome, Scotland, Egypt, Persia and South America. The sport made a brief appearance in the London Games of 1908 and returned at the Antwerp Games 12 years later and has been a staple of the Olympic programme ever since. Women’s hockey was introduced in 1980. At the London 2012 Olympic Games, men’s and women’s teams will be shooting for gold and glory at the new Riverbank Arena in the Olympic Park. Hockey demands speed, stamina and a mastery of intricate hand-eye coordination. Played by teams of 11 on an outdoor pitch, the sport is a long-time Olympic favourite, offering non-stop action over 14 days of competition.

Hockey

Judo

Judo came into existence as forms of unarmed combat, which were grouped under the general name "Jujitsu" or "the gentle practice." The object of all these martial arts forms was to avoid an enemy's strength through leverage, speed, and technique. Medieval Japanese warriors practiced many different combat skills. Since Jujitsu was strictly a combat technique, contests were rare and were decided only by the death or crippling of one of the contestants. Judo contests at the London 2012 Olympic Games will be a five-minute whirlwind of combat, with athletes attempting a combination of throws and holds in a bid to defeat their opponents. For London 2012, the Judo competition will be held at ExCeL.

Judo

Pentathlon

A pentathlon is a contest featuring five different events. The name is derived from Greek: combining the words pente (five) and -athlon (competition) (Greek: πένταθλον). The first pentathlon was documented in Ancient Greece and was part of the Ancient Olympic Games. Five events were contested over one day for the Ancient Olympic pentathlon, starting with the long jump, javelin throw, and discus throw, followed by the stadion (a short foot race) and wrestling. The pentathlon made its return as an Olympic event at the 1906 Games in Athens, consisting of a standing long jump, discus throw (ancient style), javelin throw, 192-metre run, and a Greco-Roman wrestling match. The modern pentathlon is a sports contest that includes fencing, 200m freestyle swimming, horse riding, and a 3km cross-country run in combination with pistol shooting.

Pentathlon

Rowing

The Rowing competition at the London 2012 Games will feature extraordinary displays of power and passion on the world-class waters at Eton Dorney. The venue is a 2,200m, eight-lane rowing course with a separate return lane constructed to international standards. It is set in a 400-acre park with a nature conservation area. In 2006, it hosted the Rowing World Championships, with high praise from both competitors and spectators. The venue’s existing facilities have been enhanced for athlete warm-up and Canoe Sprint events during the Games. These works included the installation of a new 50m-span bridge over a widened entrance to the return lake for vehicles and pedestrians. A cut-through between the competition lake and the return lake, and a new bridge over this cut-through area have also been constructed. The new cut-through enables rowers to move between the rowing course and return lake.

Rowing

Sailing

The waters of Weymouth Bay and Portland Harbour will play host to 10 exhilarating Sailing events during the London 2012 Olympic Games. Mastery over ever-changing conditions on open water requires skill and nerve. Both will be essential for competitors in the Sailing events, 14 days of competition that should offer plenty of excitement and drama in the beautiful but testing waters of Weymouth Bay, on the south coast of England. The venue comprises the Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy (WPNSA) and the adjoining commercial marina. It has kick-started the regeneration of the former Naval Air Station at Portland, now known as Osprey Quay, where new residential, commercial and marina facilities were established. Weymouth and Portland provides some of the best natural sailing waters in the UK, with facilities on land to match. The site has already hosted numerous international sailing events, including the 2006 ISAF World Youth Championships attended by over 60 nations.

Sailing

Shooting

Although shooting competition dates back several centuries, its beginnings in Olympic form are much younger. Olympic shooting was part of the first modern Olympic games in 1896, and although the program's size has grown and receded since then, its enduring presence clearly illustrates an appreciation of the importance of precision shooting in a world that's sometimes dominated by "spray and pray" firepower. During the London 2012 Games, nearly 400 competitors are shooting for gold across 15 dramatic events. The Royal Artillery Barracks provides a fitting location for Shooting with a heritage dating back to 1716 when a Royal Warrant authorised the formation of two artillery companies. The temporary shooting ranges and grandstands offer a stunning backdrop of the Barracks’ beautiful 18th century architecture.

Shooting

Swimming

Swimming has been recorded since prehistoric times; the earliest recording of swimming dates back to Stone Age paintings from around 7,000 years ago. Written references date from 2000 BCE. Some of the earliest references to swimming include the Gilgamesh, the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Bible, Beowulf, and other sagas. Swimming was part of the first modern Olympic games in 1896 in Athens. Hugely popular around the world as a leisure activity and a competitive sport, Swimming has featured at every modern Olympic Games. Other than the Marathon Swimming 10km event, held in the Serpentine in Hyde Park, the Swimming competition will take place in the Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park.

Swimming

Synchronised Swimming

At the turn of the 20th century, synchronized swimming was known as water ballet. The first recorded competition was in 1891 in Berlin, Germany. Many swim clubs were formed around that time, and the sport simultaneously developed within several countries, including Australia, Canada, France, Germany, and the USA.  Synchronized swimming is a hybrid form of swimming, dance and gymnastics, consisting of swimmers (either duets or teams) performing a synchronized routine of elaborate moves in the water, accompanied by music. Synchronized swimming demands advanced water skills, and requires great strength, endurance, flexibility, grace, artistry and precise timing, as well as exceptional breath control when upside down underwater. Having made its Olympic debut at the Los Angeles 1984 Games, the all-female event will be held at the dazzling Aquatics Centre during London 2012.

Synchronised Swimming

Table Tennis

Power, subtlety and lightning-fast reflexes will all be on display at ExCel during the Table Tennis competition. The sport has come a long way from its origins in the late 19th century, when it developed as an after-dinner game played by upper-class English families. More than a century later, Table Tennis is a breathtaking spectacle that blends power, speed, skill and subtlety. It’s the biggest participation sport in the world.To anyone who witnessed China’s clean sweep of all four gold medals in Beijing, there is absolutely no reason to believe that anything will change in London. The extraordinary enthusiasm of the Chinese fans may be hard to replicate in the ExCel but it will be one of the best shows at the Games, with the quality of fare on offer guaranteed to be as compelling, almost hypnotic, as ever.

Table Tennis

Taekwondo

Taekwondo is a martial art that in "todays" form of self defense has evolved by combining many different styles of martial arts that existed in Korea over the last 2,000 years and some martial arts styles from countries that surround Korea. Taekwondo incorporates the abrupt linear movements of Karate and the flowing, circular patterns of Kung-fu with native kicking techniques. The word Taekwondo translates into English as the way of foot and fist – an accurate description of the principles behind this Korean martial art. Powerful kicks and punches are, literally, the name of the game, which offers tension, drama and plenty of action. Expect plenty of excitement at ExCeL when the Taekwondo competitors take to the court at the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Taekwondo

Tennis

Most historians believe that tennis originated in France in the 12th century, but the ball was then struck with the palm of the hand. It was not until the 16th century that rackets came into use, and the game began to be called "tennis." It was popular in England and France, although the game was only played indoors where the ball could be hit off the wall. This later created much controversy between many people who thought that it was unfair for the opposing team. They claimed that the other team was able to hit the ball in a certain way for it to hit the wall and come back to them. Henry VIII of England was a big fan of this game, which historians now refer to as real tennis. ust three weeks after the end of the annual grand slam tournament, Wimbledon will once again welcome the best players in the world for the London 2012 Tennis competition.

Tennis

Triathlon

The Olympic triathlon is composed of two medal events. One is for men and the other is for women. Both use the same distances of 1.5 km, 40 km, and 10 km. Mass starts are used and drafting is allowed during the cycling phase. More than half a million spectators lined the Sydney streets to watch the first ever Olympic Triathlon at the 2000 Games. The six Triathlon events held since the sport’s Olympic debut have been won by athletes from six different countries: Canada and Switzerland in 2000; New Zealand and Austria in 2004; and Germany and Australia in 2008. At London 2012, the Triathlon will begin and end in Hyde Park. The events will begin with a 1,500m swim in the Serpentine; continue with a seven-lap, 40km bike ride around a course that takes in Buckingham Palace and the Wellington Arch; and end with a four-lap, 10km run around the Serpentine to the finish.

Triathlon

Volleyball

Born in a sweaty YMCA gymnasium in Holyoke, Massachusetts, when William G Morgan invented an alternative to basketball that the older members could play - initially calling it “Mintonette”, which appears to be a word invented by Morgan for his new game. It was later changed to volleyball after a spectator commented that the game involved a lot of volleying the ball back and forth, so this would be a more appropriate name. A century later, Volleyball is anything but gentle – few sports on the Olympic programme offer such fast and exhileration action. olleyball made its Olympic debut at the Tokyo 1964 Games for both men and women. At Beijing 2008, the gold medals were won by the USA (men) and Brazil (women). The London 2012 Olympic Competitions in Volleyball will take place at Earls Court.

Volleyball

Water Polo

Water Polo developed during the 19th century as an aquatic version of rugby, played informally in rivers and lakes. The version of the game that survives today is closer to Handball: a fast, tough and demanding sport, it has featured on every Olympic programme since the Paris 1900 Games. Women’s Water Polo was introduced at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. Played by teams of seven in a pool with a goal at each end, Water Polo is a thrilling spectacle. Distinguishable by its silver-coloured wrap and inflatable roof, the temporary Water Polo Arena is located in the south-east corner of the Olympic Park, alongside the Aquatics Centre. It is the first dedicated Water Polo venue to be built for an Olympic Games.

Water Polo

Weightlifting

The genealogy of lifting can be traced back to the beginning of recorded history where man's fascination with physical abilities can be found among numerous ancient writings. The sport originated in ancient Egypt and Greece as a way of testing mans strength and power. Men’s Weightlifting featured at the first modern Olympic Games in 1896, with women’s Weightlifting introduced at Sydney 2000. Weightlifting is a simple, engaging test of human strength, where competitors are required to perform two types of lift - the ‘clean and jerk’ and the ‘snatch’ - and the athlete lifting the highest combined total wins. Weightlifting will showcase a test of pure strength – the oldest and most basic form of physical competition. At the London Olympics weightlifting is staged at the ExCel exhibition centre.

Weightlifting

Wrestling

For the ancient Greeks, wrestling was a very big deal. It virtually defined the original Olympic Games as the marquee event. Among the sport's noted practitioners was the philosopher Plato, who had the brawn and the brains to get out of a clinch; one of wrestling's early sportswriters was Homer, who recounted epic matches. Recognised as one of the world’s oldest sports, Wrestling was first held at the ancient Olympics in 708 BC, and Greco-Roman Wrestling was included at the Athens 1896 Games, the first of the modern era. Played out on a circular mat, the sport is a battle of nerves, strength and skill. The London 2012 Wrestling competition takes place at the ExCel and consists of two disciplines – Greco-Roman, where athletes use their upper bodies and arms only, and Freestyle, where athletes can use any part of their bodies.

Wrestling

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